There are currently no supply outages on our South Australia network. To report an outage, or if you're unexpectedly without gas supply and want more information, please contact our Gas Supply Faults hotline on 1800 898 220. For information on our Covid-19 response see below.

Report a fault:  1800 898 220
Report a leak:  1800 GAS LEAK
General enquiries:  1300 001 001
 
 

 

 
 
 

 

AGN FAQ

We have extensive information on our website and in our FAQs, but if you can't find what you're looking for feel free to contact us.

 

General

Renewable gas is a term used to describe gases that do not produce any additional carbon emissions in their production and use. Common forms of renewable gas include hydrogen and biomethane. These can be used in the same way as natural gas is today.

Hydrogen does not contain any carbon and can be produced using water and renewable electricity, meaning the entire process is carbon free.

Biomethane is carbon neutral - it harnesses the energy potential from organic materials such as landfill gas, agricultural waste and sewage, supporting the circular economy.

By blending and ultimately replacing natural gas with renewable gas we can use our existing infrastructure to supply renewable gas to our customers. It also means customers retain their choice of energy supply, and those industries relying on gas can continue to access it.

Renewable blended gas is the term used to describe gas supply that is part renewable gas and part natural gas. Blending renewable gas with the natural gas already being supplied to customers means we can start to decarbonise energy supply using our existing infrastructure and with minimal impact to customers. It also means customers retain their choice of energy supply, and those industries relying on gas can continue to access it.

Today Australia’s energy system relies on diverse sources of energy – natural gas and liquid fuels (petrol and diesel) are used for more than double the energy provided by electricity. It’s important that as we move towards net zero emissions we continue to use diverse sources of energy - if we don’t maintain diversity we risk developing a more costly and less reliable energy system overall.

Importantly, modelling indicates that decarbonising natural gas through renewable hydrogen can be up to 50% cheaper than electrification as it avoids significant investment in additional electricity infrastructure such as poles, wires and additional batteries.

It also means customers retain their choice of energy supply, and those industries relying on gas can continue to access it.

AGN owns gas distribution networks (pipelines) that deliver gas to over 1.3 million homes and businesses in South Australia, Victoria, Queensland, New South Wales and the Northern Territory.

We are one of Australia's largest natural gas distribution companies, with over 25,000 kilometres of distribution networks and 1,000 kilometres of transmission pipelines.

AGN receives a portion of energy retailer natural gas invoices to consumers, which covers the costs of transporting natural gas from the high-pressure transmission pipelines to your street and home.

OAGN is one of three companies that came together in 2017 to form Australian Gas Infrastructure Group (AGIG) . AGIG is one of the largest energy infrastructure businesses in Australia, owning and operating infrastructure that delivers gas to more than two million Australian homes and businesses. AGIG also delivers gas that supports the Australian economy – for power generators, mines and manufactures.

AGN has a long history serving Australians. Our origins date back over 150 years to the gas distribution networks of the former South Australian and Brisbane Gas Companies, and the Gas and Fuel Corporation of Victoria.

We’re experts in building and operating gas pipelines to deliver gas safely and reliably to our customers. We call on this experience in the development of renewable gas projects.

On our distribution networks, we are targeting 10% renewable gas by volume by 2030, and offering 100% renewable gas to new housing estates by no later than 2025. Our aim is to fully decarbonise our distribution networks by 2040 as a stretch target and by no later than 2050.

This is consistent with Australian state and territory ambitions which collectively target being net zero carbon by 2050, and with the ambitions of several states who are explicitly targeting 10% renewable gas in networks by 2030.

Image: Australian Gas Networks’ Low Carbon Strategy

Renewable gas is here now. Hydrogen Park South Australia commenced in May 2021 and is delivering volumes of up to 5% renewable hydrogen to more than 700 homes in the nearby suburb of Mitchell Park. Hydrogen Park Gladstone is currently being developed and will deliver up to a 10% renewable hydrogen blend to the Gladstone gas distribution network in Queensland in 2022.

This is just the start. Ultimately, in line with our Low Carbon Strategy we are targeting volumes of up to 10% renewable gas across our networks by 2030 and 100% renewable gas by 2040 as a stretch target.

 

About Renewable Hydrogen

Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant molecule in the universe. It is colourless, odourless, non-toxic and an excellent carrier of energy.

Like natural gas, hydrogen can be used to heat buildings, power vehicles and produce electricity. Unlike natural gas, when burned, hydrogen produces only heat and water vapour - no carbon emissions.

In nature, hydrogen is found attached to other elements, which means we need to separate it before use. If we do this in a renewable way the hydrogen is renewable hydrogen.

A common way of producing renewable hydrogen, and the way we are producing it, is through electrolysis with renewable electricity and water.

Electrolysis is the process of splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen using electricity. Electrolysis has been around for a long time, first appearing in the 1800s and is in use around the world today. By using renewable electricity, the entire process is carbon free – the hydrogen from this process is often referred to as ‘renewable’ or ‘green’ hydrogen.

Hydrogen can also be produced from natural gas or coal through steam methane reformation or autothermal reformation. This process releases CO2 and hydrogen produced this way is called ‘brown’ hydrogen. If the CO2 is captured and stored, then it becomes low carbon and is called ‘blue’ hydrogen.

We will use renewable electricity derived from the sun and wind in our projects to ensure that the entire process is carbon-free.

Renewable electricity may be supplied directly to the project (behind-the-meter) or can be sourced from the grid by purchasing and surrendering Renewable Energy Certificates.

Decarbonisation of energy is a big challenge, and we need lots of solutions. Renewable electricity is a very important part of the answer, but it can’t decarbonise all parts of the economy.

Using electricity to produce hydrogen is a complementary source of energy. It brings together gas and electricity networks, enabling renewable electricity to be used more efficiently – for example using excess renewable electricity (wind power that would have otherwise been curtailed at night or excess rooftop solar in the middle of the day) to produce hydrogen gas which is easily stored and can also be used to decarbonise the economy.

Water is a precious resource, and we are conscious to use it respectfully. Producing 1kg of hydrogen through electrolysis requires 9-to-15L of water. For context, converting all gas supplied via the South Australian gas network to hydrogen using electrolysis would result in an increase in the state’s water consumption of around 2%.

The industry is always looking for ways to make water consumption more sustainable, for example we are targeting increased efficiency and considering ways to use desalinated water and waste water.

Hydrogen has long been used in Australia as a fuel for industry (such as steel making and fertilisers) and for oil refining. It can also be used in the manufacture of many common household goods, like margarine!

In recent years, using hydrogen as a direct energy source and as a transport fuel has gained momentum around the word, as we look to transition away from fossil fuels to carbon-free alternatives.

In late-2019, all Australian Governments agreed to sets a path to build Australia's hydrogen industry through the National Hydrogen Strategy. Under the leadership of Australia’s Chief Scientist, Dr Alan Finkel, the Strategy recognises hydrogen’s ability to decarbonise gas, power and transport and to underpin a new growth sector, with jobs and wider economic benefits.

It is timely for us to pursue hydrogen now, as the need to decarbonise grows and as the costs of technology (such as electrolysers) are reducing. There are multiple hydrogen projects online or under development across Australia, you can view a list of all Australian hydrogen projects at the ‘Australian Hydrogen Projects and Research Centres’ portal here.

Hydrogen as a clean energy source is already being used in Japan, South Korea, China, Europe, and the United States, both as 100% hydrogen and blended with natural gas. A few of these initiatives are outlined below:

  • A project in Amerland in the Netherlands blends up to 20% hydrogen into their natural gas network for use by domestic consumers.
  • In the Klanxbüll/Neukirchen region of Germany, gas customers were supplied with a natural gas blend containing up to 10% volume hydrogen.
  • The GRHYD project in France involves blending up to 20% hydrogen into natural gas network to deliver to domestic customers and a hospital.
  • In the UK, the HyDeploy project blends 20% hydrogen to two project areas. The UK are also undertaking studies on the full conversion of gas networks to 100% hydrogen.
  • The Tokyo Olympics were the ‘Green Olympics’ and will rely on hydrogen to power vehicles and to the Olympic Torch.
  • Several countries such as Japan and South Korea have hydrogen strategies outlining hydrogen use in sectors such as transport, power generation and businesses and homes
  • South Korea plans to establish three hydrogen cities by 2022 that will use hydrogen for the city’s cooling, heating, transport and electricity supply, and wants 10% of cities by 2030 and 30% by 2040 to follow this model.

 

Information for Customers

You do not need to do anything. We are working with industry and governments across Australia to deliver the renewable gas future.

Hydrogen Park South Australia commenced in May 2021 and is delivering volumes of up to 5% renewable hydrogen to more than 700 homes in the suburb of Mitchell Park, while Hydrogen Park Gladstone is currently being developed and will deliver up to a 10% renewable hydrogen blend to the Gladstone gas distribution network in Queensland in 2022.

We will then move to large scale blending as we target 10% renewable gas across our networks by 2030, this includes through Hydrogen Park Murray Valley which was recently awarded funding by the Australian Renewable Energy Agency and will deliver up to a 10% renewable hydrogen blend to more than 40,000 customers in Wodonga and Albury.

From 2025 we want to be able to offer new housing developments a 100% renewable gas product, before conversion of our existing networks from 10% to 100% renewable gas begins from 2030. At this point a change to hydrogen appliances may be required, we are working with appliance manufacturers to make sure this occurs as smoothly as possible.

We are committed to engaging with the community. When renewable gas projects are developed in your community, we will let you know.

You can be confident that your connection to the gas network will provide you with the energy you require and also help you transition to a low carbon future

Our current plans are to blend volumes of up to 10% renewable hydrogen by 2030. This blended gas remains consistent with the Australian Specifications for natural gas. Beyond 2030 we will look to convert to 100% renewable gas, which may require some change to appliances - work is already underway with the appliance sector to make this transition as smooth as possible.

We are committed to engaging with the community. When renewable gas projects are developed in your area we will let you know well in advance to ensure any questions you may have are answered.

We are experts in developing and operating gas infrastructure safely and reliably. Our commitment to safety underpins everything we do, and we must be satisfied that our renewable gas projects are safe before first production.

Hydrogen, like other fuels, is flammable and this is a key reason it can provide us with energy. It also means we need to treat hydrogen and renewable blended gas with respect, as we do natural gas, electricity, petrol and other energy carriers.

The properties of hydrogen are well known and there is a significant body of evidence on its safe handing, including from industries that have produced, transported and used hydrogen for more than 100 years.

While hydrogen is odourless and burns with an invisible flame, odorants and colourants will be added for use in the home, such that flames can be seen and leaks can be detected by smell - just like natural gas. Our networks are also predominately polyethylene (plastic), which is suitable for 100% renewable gas.

As long-term owners of the gas networks, we are satisfied that we can adapt to the safety requirements for managing renewable gases. We are further subject to regulation by government bodies, which are designed to ensure our commitment to safety, reliability and service continue.

Yes. The areas to which we are supplying blended renewable gas, as well as the majority of our networks across the country, are new generation polyethylene (plastic pipes) and are suitable for transporting hydrogen.

The introduction of hydrogen into our network does not cause our gas pipes to leak. On occasion gas pipes do leak for other reasons though, such as damage from tree roots or damage by someone hitting the main.

Should a leak occur in the project area, our response and safety procedures remain the same.

Neither hydrogen nor natural gas smell in their normal state.

Natural gas supplied via the gas network contains a special odorant to give it its distinctive smell, so that leaks can be detected. Blending up to 10% hydrogen with natural gas will not bring the odorant outside of acceptable levels. If there is a leak, you will still detect the ‘natural gas’ smell.

If you smell natural gas, report the leak immediately by calling the 24-hour 1800 GAS LEAK (1800 427 532).

There are also other routine gas safety measures in place on the gas network, including regular leak detection surveys, which use specialist equipment. These surveys will continue in the project zone as is normal in the rest of the network.

The blended gas contains up to 10% renewable hydrogen which is not expected to change the colour of the flame.

Gas safety advice for customers remains the same during the project. The number you call during an emergency remains the same at 1800 GAS LEAK (1800 427 532).

Historically, Australians relied upon Towns Gas to meet demand. Towns Gas was manufactured from coal and consisted of 50-60% hydrogen. Some places such as Hong Kong and Singapore still rely on Towns Gas.

Australia switched from Towns Gas upon the discovery of natural gas, because natural gas was considered more reliable and economic. This occurred in the 1970s in South Australia, whilst some places, including parts of Queensland relied on Towns Gas until the late 1990s.

Today we know that cost of producing hydrogen is decreasing and that blending renewable hydrogen with natural gas is the first step towards lowering carbon emissions.

Of course. On average there are approximately 100,000 new gas connections across Australia every year. Connecting to the gas network today provides you the benefits of natural gas – safe, reliable, controllable energy – and a pathway to renewable gas in the near future. The connection process will be no different for natural gas or a blended gas.

The appliances sold in Australia are designed to operate efficiently and effectively with natural gas. They are tested with varying gas compositions to account for the varying sources of natural gas supplied around Australia. One such “limit” gas contains 13% hydrogen, and therefore all certified household gas appliances sold in Australia have undergone a range of safety tests with this level of hydrogen.

Consistent with this and with our own appliance testing program, we are confident that your existing home appliances will work safely, reliably and effectively with up to 10% hydrogen blends and potentially even higher - with international projects supplying up to 20% hydrogen blends.

When receiving 100% renewable hydrogen gas – which is being targeted for post-2030 - new appliances or burner parts may be required.

100% hydrogen appliances are in use throughout Australia and the world today – we have hydrogen barbeques that we use at community events – but at the moment they are niche product whilst the market establishes itself. Appliance manufacturers are already working on hydrogen ready appliances that will easily transition from natural gas to hydrogen gas. Hydrogen cars, trucks and forklifts are also available.

Our Low Carbon Strategy outlines our plans to supply 10% renewable gas by 2030 before starting the conversion to 100% renewable gas. The timing of 100% conversion (post-2030) is aligned with when many appliances will be able to be replaced as part of their natural retirement cycle which will also contribute to a smooth transition.

We understand that price is very important to our customers.

At the moment producing renewable gas is a new industry in Australia and is more expensive than natural gas.

Just like solar, wind and battery power, in order to drive down costs we need to develop projects and increase scale. We are doing this with the support of Governments, who are providing project funding in order to ensure customers do not bear added costs. Consistent with this, customers receiving blended renewable gas as part of our Hydrogen Park South Australia (Mitchell Park, South Australia) and Hydrogen Park Gladstone (Gladstone, Queensland) projects will pay no more than if they were receiving 100% natural gas.

Our modelling indicates that renewable hydrogen and biomethane can be produced at prices equivalent to natural gas by 2030 if not before. This is consistent with the Federal Government targets of “H2 under $2 per kg”. At this time we will look to begin conversion of our networks to 100% renewable gas.

Today Australia’s energy system relies on diverse sources of energy – natural gas and liquid fuels (petrol and diesel) are used for more than double the energy provided by electricity. It’s important that as we move towards net zero emissions we continue to use diverse sources of energy – if we don’t maintain diversity we risk developing a more costly and less reliable energy system overall. Importantly, modelling indicates that decarbonising natural gas through renewable hydrogen can be up to 50% cheaper than electrification as it avoids significant investment in additional electricity infrastructure such as poles, wires and additional batteries.

 

About Hydrogen Park South Australia and blended gas in Mitchell Park

Hydrogen Park South Australia (HyP SA) is the name of the facility in South Australia where we produce hydrogen from renewable electricity and water using a process known as electrolysis.

The renewable hydrogen is then blended with natural gas and supplied into our existing distribution at volumes of up to 5%, providing lower carbon gas to our customers in the nearby suburb of Mitchell Park.

HyP SA also supplies industry via tube trailers (long storage tubes on the back of semi-trailers). This is complementary to the supply of renewable blended gas to Mitchell Park and does not impact the project in any way. We are also considering supplying hydrogen to transport markets, with hydrogen vehicles being considered as an important technology to reduce emissions from the transport sector as part of South Australia’s Electric Vehicle Action Plan.

HyP SA began production in May 2021. You can watch a video on the project here.

Hydrogen is made using an electrolyser, which splits water into hydrogen and oxygen using renewable electricity. The process by which this occurs is known as electrolysis. Electrolysis has been around for a long time, first appearing in the 1800s and is in use around the world today.

HyP SA uses a 1.25 megawatt Siemens Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) electrolyser, which can produce up to 20 kilograms per hour. The electrolyser can rapidly respond to fluctuations in the electricity market ramping up when renewable electricity is abundant and switches off in times of high electricity demand.

There is approximately 40kg of hydrogen storage on site in a purpose-built vessel.

You can watch an explainer video here.

Renewable electricity is purchased from the local electricity network. HyP SA targets operating when there is surplus renewable electricity in the system, and we will purchase Large-scale Generation Certificates as required to ensure the electricity used to produce hydrogen is renewable.

Mains water is purchased from the local SA Water network, in the same way you would have it delivered to your house.

The water volumes consumed to produce hydrogen are very low: up to 300 litres per hour, or the equivalent of a 30 minute shower using a low flow shower head. For context, converting all gas supplied via the South Australian gas network to hydrogen using electrolysis would result in an increase in the state’s water consumption of around 2%.

If you live in Mitchell Park, south of Alawoona Ave: in the area bounded by Alawoona Avenue, the railway line, Sturt Creek and Sturt Road, then you’re likely in the area. You can contact the project team if you want to confirm.

If your property is within the zoned area of the project then you already receive the blended gas via the existing gas network. This blended gas supply began on 19 May 2021.

Image: Map of Mitchell Park blended gas project area.

You do not need to do anything at all. The blended renewable gas is automatically supplied to your property.

The South Australian Government recommends that you have your gas appliances serviced every two years by a licensed gas fitter. If you live in the project area, as a benefit of being involved we are offering a free Gas Appliance Efficiency Audit, valued at $200.

An audit can ensure gas cooking and heating appliances are running safely and efficiently to help to lower gas bills. To check if you are eligible for an audit, contact the project team. Terms and conditions apply.

There is no change to the price you pay as a result of receiving this renewable blended gas. Customers pay the same amount as if they were receiving 100% natural gas.

You may notice a slight change to volume of gas received and to the Pressure Correction Factor on your bill. We have altered the Pressure Correction Factor to ensure you pay no more than customers receiving 100% natural gas.

Any arrangements you have in place with your gas retailer will continue, including receiving your gas bill in your usual billing cycle.

Have you checked the Information for Customers FAQ section? If you still have questions, please contact us.

 

About Hydrogen Park Gladstone and blended gas in Gladstone

Hydrogen Park Gladstone (HyP Gladstone) is the name of the facility in Queensland where we produce hydrogen from renewable electricity and water using a process known as electrolysis.

The renewable hydrogen is then blended with natural gas and supplied into our existing distribution network at volumes of up to 10%, providing lower carbon gas to our customers in the Gladstone region.

HyP Gladstone is expected to begin production in September 2022.

We are considering supplying hydrogen to transport markets, with hydrogen vehicles being considered as an important technology to reduce emissions from the transport sector as part of Queensland’s Hydrogen Industry Development Strategy 2019-2024.

Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant molecule in the universe. It is colourless, odourless, non-toxic and an excellent carrier of energy.

Like natural gas, hydrogen can be used to heat buildings, power vehicles and produce electricity. Unlike natural gas, when burned, hydrogen produces only heat and water vapour - no carbon emissions.

In nature, hydrogen is found attached to other elements, which means we need to separate it before use. If we do this in a renewable way the hydrogen can be used as a renewable form of energy.

We are planning to produce hydrogen using an electrolyser, which splits water into hydrogen and oxygen using renewable electricity. The process by which this occurs is known as electrolysis. Electrolysis has been around for a long time, first appearing in the 1800s and is in use around the world today.

HyP Gladstone will use a relatively small 175 kilowatt Proton Exchange Membrane electrolyser, which can produce up to 2.75 kilograms of hydrogen per hour. The electrolyser can rapidly respond to fluctuations in the electricity market ramping up when renewable electricity is abundant and switches off in times of high electricity demand.

There is a small amount (10kg) of hydrogen storage on site in a purpose-built vessel. The energy stored in this vessel is equivalent to around four standard LPG barbeque bottles (8.5kg bottles).

About The Project

Image: Schematic of Hydrogen Park Gladstone.

Natural gas network connected customers living in Gladstone Central, Barney Point, South Gladstone and West Gladstone will receive the blended gas product from the HyP Gladstone facility. The below map highlights the blended gas project area.

If your property is within the zoned area of the project then you will receive the blended gas via the existing gas network. Properties in the project area were first informed of the project in August 2021 through a letter box drop. You can contact the project team if you want to confirm if you will be receiving blended gas.

Image: Map of Gladstone blended gas project area.

You do not need to do anything at all. The blended renewable gas is automatically supplied to your property.

The Queensland Government recommends that you check your gas appliances regularly. If you live in the project area, you may elect to have a free Gas Appliance Efficiency Audit, valued at $200.

An audit can ensure gas cooking and heating appliances are running safely and efficiently to help to lower gas bills. To check if you are eligible for an audit, contact the project team. Terms and conditions apply.

If you live in the Gladstone blended gas project area, you will start receiving the renewable blended gas from the latter half of 2022. We will continue to provide you with regular updates at the project progresses. Register here to get the latest updates.

There is no change to the price you pay as a result of receiving renewable blended gas. Customers pay the same amount as if they were receiving 100% natural gas.

You may notice a slight change to the Heating Value on your bill, to ensure you pay no more than customers receiving 100% natural gas. Any arrangements you have in place with your gas retailer will continue, including receiving your gas bill in your usual billing cycle.

HyP Gladstone is intended to operate during the day, when there is significant renewable electricity generation (predominantly solar) in Queensland. The Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) calculates and publishes a Carbon Dioxide Equivalent Intensity Index (CDEII) for all NEM regions, including Queensland.

To make the electricity renewable, we will purchase and surrender sufficient quantities of Large-scale Generation Certificates (LGC’s). By purchasing LGCs and then surrendering them to the Clean Energy Regulator, we can ensure that all our electricity when bought from the Queensland grid is renewable.

LGCs are created by registered renewable power stations across Australia for every megawatt hour of power they generate. By purchasing LGCs and then surrendering them to the Clean Energy Regulator, we can ensure that all our electricity when bought from the Queensland grid is renewable. This is consistent with the way electricity retailers certify green retail products.

Mains water will be purchased from the local Gladstone network, in the same way you would have it delivered to your house.

The water volumes consumed to produce hydrogen are low, an average of 101L litres per hour over a 24hr period. Annual volumes used to produce the hydrogen will be very low, the equivalent to six “water wise” households according to Gladstone Regional Council guidelines.

The HyP Gladstone facility will be located on a 30x37 metre, or 1,110 square meter, site (fence line to fence line). This is similar in area to around four tennis courts or one Olympic swimming pool.

The natural terrain of the proposed site has allowed us to design the facility so that it is not visually prominent from the street or surrounding residential areas. The existing earth bund and landscaping along Derby Street will be maintained providing excellent visual screening of the facility. The site is also visually screened from residential areas to the east, north and west by a combination of existing natural terrain and vegetation.

Hydrogen Park Gladstone

Key components of the development include an electrolyser unit, hydrogen blending skid, hydrogen storage and city gate. As outlined in the below artist impression, the facility is modular in nature.

Hydrogen Park Gladstone

The existing natural gas city gate on Brelsin Street (near the Dawson highway) requires upgrading and is being relocated to Derby Street. The city gate takes gas from the transmission pipeline network and reduces its pressure for use in the distribution network which supplies homes and businesses in Gladstone.

It is preferable to co-locate the city gate and the hydrogen facility in one small compound. Co-locating enables blending of the renewable hydrogen gas with natural gas in the existing gas distribution network as we look to decarbonise gas supply in the region. Blending needs to occur in proximity to the distribution network as blended gas can’t be transported through the larger pipelines that make up the gas transmission network.

The Derby Street site has the advantage of being large enough that the balance of the property provides an additional buffer from adjoining residential areas and has existing landscaping treatments which will ensure that the development is not visually prominent.

This project reduces the amount of carbon in our gas network. As a business, we are committed to decarbonising domestic gas use in Australia. On our distribution networks, we are targeting 10% renewable gas by volume by 2030, and offering 100% renewable gas to new housing estates by no later than 2025. Our aim is to fully decarbonise our distribution networks by 2040 as a stretch target and by no later than 2050. You can learn more about our Low Carbon Strategy here.

Hydrogen Park Gladstone is one of our first steps on this journey. It demonstrates renewable hydrogen production at a small scale and starts decarbonisation of domestic gas use.

Safety is our number one priority. At AGN, we are experts in developing and operating gas infrastructure – the core elements of what we deliver are safe and reliable energy services. Hydrogen, like other fuels, is flammable and this is a key reason it can provide us with energy. It also means we need to treat hydrogen with respect, as we do natural gas, electricity, petrol and other energy carriers.

Hydrogen is already produced and used around Australia today, including at our existing Hydrogen Park South Australia facility located in the metropolitan Adelaide suburb of Tonsley (learn more here). At Hydrogen Park Gladstone, only small volumes of hydrogen are proposed to be stored on-site (approximately 10kg) which is a similar amount of energy to four standard 8.5kg barbeque LPG bottles.

We are subject to regulation by government bodies, which are designed to ensure our commitment to safety, reliability and service continue. We will have all necessary approvals in place before production begins.

We have conducted noise modelling that has been submitted to Council as part of our Development Application which shows that the development will comply with the applicable requirements for development near residential areas. Equipment has been carefully selected and designed to ensure that the associated noise profile is appropriate for the location.

Hydrogen Park Gladstone is a small demonstration facility designed to produce hydrogen to start to decarbonise domestic gas supply in Gladstone and to break down barriers to entry for the renewable hydrogen industry. There are no plans to expand production at this site.

We are considering developing a refuelling facility (similar to a small petrol station) alongside Hydrogen Park Gladstone. This station would be used for up to three hydrogen fuel cell vehicles or one hydrogen fuel cell bus. This is at an early stage and would be subject to a separate Development Application and approvals process.

No, the current facility design is an unmanned site and during normal operations will only be accessed during scheduled maintenance. If refuelling does go ahead in the future it will only be designed to support up to three cars or one bus, which would typically be fleet vehicles and not general public.

This $4.2m project was announced in July 2020, supported by funding from the Queensland Government of up to $1.78m.

Current work is focussed on securing the site and on lodging our Development Application. We are targeting first production in the latter part of 2022.

 

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